Battery electric cars are a better choice for emissions reduction

A study of energy use in a community near Stanford finds that all-electric battery cars offer a more affordable way to reduce carbon dioxide emissions than cars powered by hydrogen.


Many communities would be better off investing in electric vehicles that run on batteries instead of hydrogen fuel cells, in part because the hydrogen infrastructure provides few additional energy benefits for the community besides clean transportation.

That's according to a study in the November issue of the journal Energy by scientists at Stanford University and the Technical University of Munich (TUM). They compared cars that run on batteries versus hydrogen fuel cells in a hypothetical future where the cost of electric vehicles is more affordable.

"We looked at how large-scale adoption of electric vehicles would affect total energy use in a community, for buildings as well as transportation," said lead author Markus Felgenhauer, a doctoral candidate at TUM and former visiting scholar at the Stanford Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP). "We found that investing in all-electric battery vehicles is a more economical choice for reducing carbon dioxide emissions, primarily due to their lower cost and significantly higher energy efficiency."

"Studies such as these are needed to identify the lowest cost and most efficient pathways to deep decarbonization of the global energy system," added study co-author Sally Benson, a professor of energy resources engineering at Stanford and director of GCEP.

You are reading a member exclusive article and we’re glad you’re enjoying it

To continue reading, you need a membership (free for limited time) account. If you are a member (with an account), please sign in ... if you would like to subscribe, please do so below.


Want to learn more? View membership benefits

More Stories From Around the Web:

More Stories on this Topic