San Mateo, Calif. | SolarCity announced it has entered into contract with Walmart for the installation of new solar projects at facilities in up to 36 states over the next four years.

SolarCity has completed more than 200 solar projects at Walmart locations since 2010. SolarCity has also installed and tested energy storage projects co-located with solar power generation at 13 Walmart facilities since early 2013, and will be incorporating ten additional storage projects in the next year.

Since the company’s last announcement in 2013, SolarCity has installed nearly 50 solar projects for Walmart including:

– Arizona – 10 carport and 2 rooftop projects totaling more than 5 megawatts
– California – 12 rooftop and 3 carport projects totaling 6.3 megawatts
– New York – 4 rooftop projects totaling 1.6 megawatts
– Oregon – 3 rooftop projects totaling 283 kilowatts
– Puerto Rico – 13 rooftop projects totaling 2.9 megawatts

Walmart is also at the forefront of commercializing storage technology and was a pilot customer for SolarCity’s energy storage system for businesses. Since early 2013, Walmart has tested 13 battery storage projects with solar installations across California to provide additional savings to Walmart by using stored electricity to lower peak demand charges.

The next ten solar energy storage projects will each use a larger 200 kilowatt (400 kilowatt hour) battery, expanding battery storage capabilities as well as further reducing energy expense.

SolarCity has created 5,000 permanent American jobs since it initiated its first project with Walmart in 2010.

Walmart is the top commercial solar energy user in the United States according to the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA), and the largest on-site renewable energy user in America according to EPA’s Green Power Partnership.

This release contains forward-looking statements including, but not limited to, statements regarding future projects and associated cost savings, job creation related to solar projects, and environmental offsets for current and future projects.

Forward-looking statements should not be read as a guarantee of future performance or results, and will not necessarily be accurate indications of the times at, or by, which such performance or results will be achieved, if at all.

Forward-looking statements are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual performance or results to differ materially from those expressed in or suggested by the forward looking statements.

You should read the section entitled “Risk Factors” in SolarCity’s quarterly report on Form 10-Q, which has been filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission and identifies certain of these and additional risks and uncertainties.

We do not undertake any obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise.

Derick Lila
Derick is a Clark University graduate—and Fulbright alumni with a Master's Degree in Environmental Science, and Policy. He has 8+ years of solar industry research, marketing, and content strategy experience.

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