This week’s trending solar stories—April 22nd, 2017

Unsubsidized solar now cheaper, William Shatner to promote solar in Vancouver and California got 50% of its electricity from solar power one day in March.

Futursim

Solar Power Is Cheaper, but the World Is Still Running on Fossil Fuels
Even without subsidies, new wind and solar power plants are usually cheaper than new coal, nuclear, or natural gas power plants.

In fact, they are often not only cheaper, but substantially so. According to Lazard, levelized cost of energy (LCOE) estimates based on averages for the U.S. as a whole show that utility-scale renewables are far less expensive than conventional power sources — even when historical subsidies for conventional power sources, or social costs such as healthcare for coal-related health problems, aren’t taken into account.

ComputerWorld

Unsubsidized wind and solar now the cheapest source for new electric power
While investments in renewable energy slumped last year, a big drop in unsubsidized costs for new wind and solar power installations indicated that they remain popular energy alternatives.

Last year, the average “Levelized cost” or total cost of generating power from solar worldwide dropped 17% percent, onshore wind costs dropped 18% and offshore wind turbine power costs fell 28%, according to a new report from the United Nations and Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF).

Business Vancouver

William Shatner to work with Vancouver’s Solar Alliance to promote solar energy
Like his character Captain James T. Kirk from the original Star Trek series, William Shatner is turning his attention where no man (or woman) has gone before; in this case, he is looking toward the sun. Vancouver’s Solar Alliance (TSX-V:SAN) has announced it will be working with the star to promote the benefits of solar energy through a public awareness campaign called “Join the Alliance – Save Money, Save the World.”

“The benefits of solar energy are significant, and I am pleased to work with Solar Alliance on this public awareness campaign,” Shatner said. “I am committed to creating a better world through action, and this is one small step towards a cleaner future that is less dependent on fossil fuels.”

TreeHugger

California got 50 percent of its electricity from solar power one day in March
If you’ve ever thought about getting solar panels on your house but worried about whether it was worth it, Google may now have just the thing to help you decide.

In a new expansion of its Project Sunroof, the company has built 3-D models of rooftops in all 50 states, looked at the trees around people’s homes, considered the local weather, and figured out how much energy each house or building can generate if its owners plunk down for some panels.


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