U.S. utilities turn to solar power—as Trump turns to fossil fuels

Their game-plan is to use smaller-scale solar farming, mostly run by local cooperatives and non-profits to boost their solar capacity.


Slumping solar power prices have made the technology seem very profitable for some U.S. utilities. This, as President Trump looks to bring back coal and fossil fuels to the forefront of American power production.

It's important to note that solar power still only accounts for a little over 1 percent of the electricity U.S. utilities generate. But, as more utilities turn towards producing some of their power using photovoltaic technology, this percentage may grow significantly.

"Solar growth is so extensive and has so much momentum behind it that we're at the point where you can't put the genie back in the bottle," said Jeffrey R.S. Brownson, a Pennsylvania State University professor who studies solar adoption. "You either learn how to work with this new medium, solar energy, or you're going to face increasing conflicts."

The gameplan for these utilities is to use smaller-scale solar farming, mostly run by local cooperatives and non-profits to boost their solar capacity.

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